About Elizabeth

Photo © Dario Lasagni, courtesy castelloinmovimento-castello di fosidnovo.

Photo © Dario Lasagni, courtesy castelloinmovimento-castello di fosidnovo.

Elizabeth Strout was born in Portland, Maine, and grew up in small towns in Maine and New Hampshire.  From a young age she was drawn to writing things down, keeping notebooks that recorded the quotidian details of her days.  She was also drawn to books, and spent hours of her youth in the local library lingering among the stacks of fiction.  During the summer months of her childhood she played outdoors, either with her brother, or, more often, alone, and this is where she developed her deep and abiding love of the physical world: the seaweed covered rocks along the coast of Maine, and the woods of New Hampshire with its hidden wildflowers.

During her adolescent years, Strout continued writing avidly, having conceived of herself as a writer from early on.  She read biographies of writers, and was already studying – on her own – the way American writers, in particular, told their stories.  Poetry was something she read and memorized; by the age of sixteen was sending out stories to magazines.  Her first story was published when she was twenty-six. 
 
Strout attended Bates College, graduating with a degree in English in 1977.  Two years later, she went to Syracuse University College of Law, where she received a law degree along with a Certificate in Gerontology.  She worked briefly for Legal Services, before moving to New York City, where she became an adjunct in the English Department of Borough of Manhattan Community College.  By this time she was publishing more stories in literary magazines and Redbook and Seventeen.  Juggling the needs that came with raising a family and her teaching schedule, she found a few hours each day to work on her writing.

 
I don’t think there was a particular book that made me want to write. They all did. I always wanted to write.
— Elizabeth Strout
 

Awards & Honors

Honorary Doctorate from Bates College (2010)

Olive Kitteridge

Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (2009)
Premio Bancarella Prize (2010)
National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist (2008)

Amy & Isabelle

Orange Prize Nominee for Fiction Shortlist (2000)
Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction (LA Times, 1999)
PEN/Faulkner Award Finalist (2000)

 
It is not “good” or “bad” that interests me as a writer, but the murkiness of human experience and the consistent imperfections of our lives.
— Elizabeth Strout