How do we become aware of class in America?

Always, I have wondered: What does it feel like to be another person? This question is the furnace behind my work. But when you write about people, you are writing about class. Time and place in history determine a great deal, and if you consider place to be a place in society, then that shapes a life, as well.
— Elizabeth Strout, "How do we become aware of class in America?"
How do we become aware of class in America?
Elizabeth Strout, Washington Post, August 28, 2017

The Atlantic: When Memories Are True Even When They’re Not

The Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Elizabeth Strout discusses Louise Glück’s poem “Nostos” and the powerful way literature can harbor recollection.

Glück seems to be saying that childhood is the only constant, immutable thing, while everything that comes after that—“the rest,” she says, our whole adult life—occurs in the shifty arena of memory. Our whole present tense takes place in the shadows of the original, pure impressions of childhood.
— Elizabeth Strout
"By Heart: When Memories Are True Even When They’re Not"
Joe Fassler, The Atlantic, May 2, 2017